CREATIVE IDEAS ON HOW TO DO LIFE WITHOUT ALL THE PLASTIC BAGS

Alternatives

Perfect for

How to do it…

Cloth Tote Bag

Just about anything:  apples, onions, potatoes, oranges, avocados, lemons, winter squash, carrots, rutabaga, corn, pomegranates, celery

Depends on the product, but many of these items can go loose into your fruit basket or your refrigerator’s produce bin.

Cloth Produce Bag

Small and sturdy fruits and vegetables:  kumquats, sugar snap peas, cherries, brussel sprouts, tangerines,  tomatoes, peaches

Leafy greens

Depends on the product, but many of these items can go loose into your fruit basket or your refrigerator’s produce bin.

It is advisable to transfer your greens to an air tight container before placing in the refrigerator.  Or you can rinse them and fold into a paper cloth.

Liner-less trash can

The Bay Area communities all have composting programs – put veggie scraps in the green bin or compost in your backyard.  Except for food waste, virtually all trash is dry and bacteria-free –

Much of our household waste these days is plastic (and other) packaging.  The packaging/dry waste can be used to contain any wet waste you throw out.  Some periodicals come in shrink wrap -

Shrink wrap from periodicals, old newspaper, plastic bags from newspaper delivery – hang onto them

Wrap meat and bones in the bags that your periodicals or magazines come in and carry it out to your large container.

Use old newspapers to wrap up wet items and carry out to the larger container.  Your kitchen can stays dry and clean-ish.

Mason Jars or reused glass spaghetti sauce jars

Nuts, beans, dried fruit

In your pantry at room temperature

A large hand-held basket

Stacking all your produce without any bags at all.  The basket approach allows for more control of where your head of lettuce sits, or your precious heirloom tomatoes.

Depends on the product, but many of these items can go loose into your fruit basket or your refrigerator’s produce bin.

Large Pyrex Glass Container or plastic Tupperware, carried in a tote bag

Loose greens, arugula, mixed greens, stinging nettles and more

Take home and drop it straight in the fridge. Greens stay good for 5-6 days.

Egg Cartons

Your next dozen eggs.  Or bring them back to replenish your egg farmers’ supply

 

Your handful of used and reused plastic bags

They appear all the time – newspaper, bread bag, pre-packaged greens; hang onto them!

Use for animal waste clean up.